Your Mental Wellness Podcast for Your Voice and Sanity

Financial Wellness: A Crucial Ingredient for Mental Wellness

December 07, 2021 Dr. Sibylle Georgianna's Leadership Practice Season 3 Episode 1
Your Mental Wellness Podcast for Your Voice and Sanity
Financial Wellness: A Crucial Ingredient for Mental Wellness
Show Notes Transcript

Today I would like to talk about the topic of Financial Wellness. If we worry about our finances, that impairs our mental wellness: stress, anxiety, fretting is contrary to a mindset of mental wellness.

I am excited to welcome our “Sherpa” (as I call the experts who are joining this podcast): Dr. Axel Meierhoefer.

 Dr. Axel Meierhoefer’s many skills grew through a successful career in the Air Force and in an executive role for a software company as well as by subsequently founding a consulting company in 2005.

The Great Recessions around 2009 introduced him to real estate and the many things it seemed to allow. He then got his Ph.D. while rebuilding his consulting company. His website is called

https://idealwealthgrower.com/.

On his podcast “The IDEAL investor show” he is serving his listeners' and clients to grow a positive attitude to be the creators of their best future, including financially. 

Sounds familiar? Axel's focus as to what he wants his listeners to take away from his podcast (e.g., a positive attitude) is similar to my focus on the ability on creating mental wellness in order to use our voice and sound decision making. 

You'r listening to YOUR Mental Wellness podcast for YOUR voice and sanity.

Thank you for joining us this week on your mental wellness podcast for your voice and sanity. Make sure to check out our show notes, visit our website, www dot tools for vitality.com where you can subscribe to the show. We would appreciate it if you would tell a friend about the podcast

Sibylle Georgianna:

Welcome back. And I'm so excited to talk about a very inspiring topic today. And this is your mental wellness podcast for your voice and sanity. So we've focused more on mental wellness, in terms of fitness like focus and attention, stressors, resilience, for example, finding ways that we keep our repelled the reptilian brain in check. And then we looked at how we can build confidence, confidence so we can develop on practice our voice into sound decision making, also known as sanity. Well, and today, I would like to talk about an exciting topic, which is financial wellness, here. And because we got to look at money and finances, because as we worry about our finances, it can impair our mental wellness, through stress, anxiety, fretting, and that's really not in line with a mindset of mental wellness that we pursue here as part of the podcast. So I'm excited to welcome our Sherpa as I call the experts who are joining in this podcast and this is today, Dr. Axel Meyer Hofer who has amazing and many skills that grew through I do believe that long and wonderful and matures and successor Korea first in the air force here, as well as an executive role in an executive role for software development, as well as then subsequently by, you know, the consulting work through which we met, I want to say a couple of years back at a presentation. And what is so impressive to me is that even a situation like the recession around 2009 was more of a launch pad than at something that held them back in terms of developing more of a focus on real estate, and also adding on I believe that PhD, that you do have another belt of while still building the consulting part. So his website currently is called ideal wealth grow a.com. And he also has a podcast called The ideal investor show, where you can hear much more about his background and his passions. And so as he's serving his listeners and clients to grow a positive attitude through creating their best future on it, also in terms of money and financial outlook, I do believe this is really a lot of overlap here because Axel, from your focus as to what you want your listeners to take away from your podcast and positive attitude, open attitude that's really similar to my focus here on creating mental wellness, and really that as a launchpad for using voice and decision making. So as as you've looked at mindset yourself, talking about however, when you talk about that, what would you how do you define and what do you mean with mindset?

Unknown:

Well, it was mainly inspired. And that's why I created this mindset manual and Sibylle, I want to thank you first for having me on your show and on your podcast. But the mindset aspect on the website and for me to create the mindset manual was triggered by the observation that many, many times in the media that seems to be this myth that is being propagated that something with investing and getting wealthy and reaching early retirement or maybe even getting to a point where you no longer have to exchange time for money. It's just something for a special small group of people who either through luck or through inheritance, or through things like that, would be able to reach that kind of like what has become almost like I don't know, the rogatory term. As far as you know, being wealthy or being part of the 1% or anything like that. And for me, I felt that's really not true. And at Idea wealth grow, what we're really helping people with is to build a passive income portfolio to reach that time freedom point to be able to actually live off passive income, and then really do the things somebody is passionate about. But to get there. The question was, what kind of a mindset do I need to have to have a chance to get there? And what I find and what I'm writing about in the mindset menu that people can download if they go to our website at IDEO. redcross.com is a lot of people that approached me when I asked him Where do you see yourself? Where are you right now? What are your financial you know, income and expenses and you're standing and your beliefs about it. They talked Very, very often from the perspective that I would define as a victim, and not really what I would encourage, and what my approach to mindset and financial fitness in that context is, is to adopt a view that puts you in the mindset of a creator. You're creating your financial journey you're creating, and by that also meaning to infuse the energy needed to overcome obstacles to take advantage of opportunities to make conscious decisions on how do I go about using the money that I earn, right. And instead of basically being in this position where everything is happening to you, rather than because of what you initiate. That's kind of what I would say, in a nutshell, what I'm trying to get is, and for your audience, I would hope that we can find many, many people who can already say I have this create a mindset. And for those who wonder, Am I more a victim? Do I see myself more than a result of the circumstances, then the result of my own doing, I would encourage them to follow what you preach, so to speak. And if anybody's interested on how that applies to financials, then just download the manual and watch the videos and work your way through. Because I think it's important that there's positive energy, it makes things so much easier to accomplish things, even if they seem almost impossible, or insurmountable.

Sibylle Georgianna:

That's beautiful, and very deep stuff. And we've definitely put the link to your website in the show notes as well. Because I also would agree that all mindset is how I say everything, but if so much. And I do like this notion of being a creator, because I guess it also depends how you were raised. But that may not be we may not see yourself as creators, when it comes to money, you know, especially if you work more of an employment, and an employment situation where, where it's not that you feel I mean, you you give to the employer, your time and skills, but you may not find yourself as a seeing yourself as that creative agent for your future. So for those who've never, I mean, probably the term passive income has been floating around everywhere, and we've come across that. But even that one, if you would, were to pull it back, what would you understand as passive income versus more like, active income?

Unknown:

Yeah, I'm happy to describe that. So fundamentally, active income from my perspective is the direct exchange, where for example, you you provide a service and somebody is paying you for that service. Now, if you are in a salaried employment situation, then you basically all the service that you basically provide, if you or you can exchange, the word service for all the work you provide to your employer throughout the month, is basically compensated in one lump sum, which would be your salary for those people who are in an hourly job, it's a little bit more direct, right? Where you would say, okay, if I'm scheduled by my employer to work 35, or 40, or 45 hours a week, and I have 20 bucks, 25 bucks, 45, whatever the number is an hourly rate. And I know gross income is the number of hours times the hourly rate, and that is what I'm going to be paid. And that's what my taxes are going to be deducted and my 401k, and whatever other things you might have. So that is, you actively provide a service and in return, you receive money back, which is salary or income, in comparison to that passive income would be where one time, you used money that you accumulated, I call that you accumulated that money in your accumulation account, but some people used to call a savings account. And you use that money to purchase something that is basically performing for you without you having to do more new services over and over because if you think active income only comes as long as you provide actively work or services to your employer. Passive income is to take our example as we preach it, if we go out and we find $150,000 house somewhere in the Midwest, then we look at our accumulation or savings account and say do I have about $30,000 accumulated there? If the answer is yes, we can purchase this house because we would put 20% down the other 80% would come from the bank. And this one time application of $30,000 will now reside in The tenants who live in this property to pay us for paying the mortgage for paying the insurance for paying the taxes for paying the property management. And after all of that is paid, whatever is left is then directly going into our pocket, which on a property like that would be something like probably three to $400 a month, but you only do this investment is $30,000 into this purchase one time. And basically, as long as you own this property, it will pay you this passive income forever. And at some point, let's say you got a 15 year mortgage on when you bought it for the 80%, that mortgage will be paid through the payment of the rent from the tenants, and then you're not just getting three $400 a month, you would get probably more like $800 a month. So if you think, or any of your listeners think, okay, let's just take an example and say, right now, you making $4,200 a month, that's what is actually the net that comes into your bank account, from your employer, employer after taxes and so forth. Right? And you say, okay, where I can get properties that pay me $400 A month in perpetuity, right? So then you can just sit down and say, okay, so how many of these properties do I need to have to replace my current income, my 4200 that I'm making with this passive income, right. And so basically, 4200 divided by four is probably right around something like 10 properties. And what's interesting, and why I use this term time freedom point is, you wouldn't buy all these 10 properties all at once you would buy them over a period of time as you have the funds in your accumulation account. And then whenever there is enough to buy another one, you buy another property. And so over time, you would buy these 10 properties, and you replace those $4,200 that you're making right now. But what also happens at some point a few years later, when the first of these properties is paid off. Now, it's not 4200 anymore. Now it's 5000. And then a few more years later, the next one gets paid off. And it's like 5500, or 5600. So you will never have less than that time freedom point number that you gave yourself. And also, I mean, we could go into the details. But naturally, if you buy something now and you have it for 10 years until you reach it time freedom point, the tenants wouldn't always pay the same rent, right? So if you get $400 Now, and let's say every two years, you increase the rent by $100, those $100 Go basically immediately into your passive income. Long story short, what it does is remember, you did a one time investment to purchase this property. And it's basically performing or working for you through the fact that you are collecting rent. And wanting some people that are maybe a little bit more into this stuff might say, okay, so what do I do doesn't anything break with these properties, you know, just like my normal house, or my normal apartment that I'm living in what I just gave, as a little example, to have three $400 left already takes into account that a little bit of money is put aside every month for repairs, or you know long term things that that might go wrong, or when a tenant moves out, and you need to find a new tenant that costs a little bit of money. So all those things are already accounted for. But if you think about it, if you compare that to your active job, if something happens to you, then what you actually provide, meaning you work stops if you get sick, or you have an accident or whatever, which also means at that point, your active income stops. Whereas in passive income, you make that one time investment as early in your life as possible. And it's it will be there forever for you. Regardless whether you are going to work or not, regardless whether you're healthy or not. Regardless whether you like your job or don't like your job or you turn your job into halftime or like we have a pandemic and suddenly all the jobs are gone, it doesn't matter. Your passive income is going to continue to be there. And the reason that we basically push quite heavily on real estate investing, especially the kind of real estate that we all know, like single family homes or maybe duplexes and stuff that we are used to living in ourselves or renting is because that is in Maslow's pyramid, which I'm sure you're very familiar with in his spoken of nirvana. There are like three fundamental things that Maslow at the time identified as core things that every human being needs. That is safety, food and shelter. And if you think about a shelter, it's just a different word for it space I live in. That's right. And so when we basically purchase these properties, we provide shelter to human beings and that will never go away. way, right? And that's why I'm so confidently saying when you generate passive income through real estate, then you will basically have that passive income as long as you own that real estate. The other thing that I want to quickly mention here, because you touched on it earlier, when we talked about active income, and how do I make the money, one of the things when it goes to mindset that I think is very important, I preached this, almost at the very first or second mentoring session, when we bring in a new client, is I want you to pay yourself first, there is this kind of cute little book called The Richest Man of Babylon. And the way he became the richest man, and by the way, you can find that on Amazon.

Sibylle Georgianna:

That's perfect.

Unknown:

But how did he became the richest man of Babylon because he took 10% of everything that came in of money, any any money, money from active work money, from a side gig money from playing music, money from grandma that came as a gift, something that you inherited, it doesn't matter where it came from, he took 10% of any money that came in, and we call that pay myself, and put it into that accumulation account. And I think we have all been conditioned somehow, to forget that we should pay ourselves first. Right? Before we actually look at the gas bill, and the electric bill, and so forth, and so forth. And if you do that, and put that money into your accumulation account and take 10% of your income, you will be surprised how soon you get to the minimum number nowadays, with the increased real estate prices, you need to have about 20 to 25,000. If you get to 30,000, absolutely unequivocably Can you purchase a property, right. And so this would be then if you have a family in the family unit, you each of the income earners of any income of any money that comes in puts away 10%. As soon as the money comes in automatically, you will see that very quickly you become or you can become an ideal investor, because you have the means to do it without having to stretch or significantly change your lifestyle. But it's also my it's a mindset thing, right? To say why would I pay everybody else first everything literally the gas, the car, the house, the rent the you name it. And I hope I'm lucky that I can pay myself something at the end, know, a shift in mindset in a creative way. And being a creator means you deserve to be paid first. And I always say take 10% And everybody can manage 90%. And

Sibylle Georgianna:

that's beautiful. That's really, really powerful, by the way, specifically, the paying yourself because even as a business owner, you kind of pay yourself but you always as you say you pay all the necessities first. And actually, my neighbor from Amsterdam recently suggested that I should start paying me on specific things first. So this is a very good reminder to really do that. And, and I also think the the mindfulness to to, to set things aside and you know, delaying gratification or just to to be mindful enough to have the maybe even the account automatically move money at the paycheck date, into a sub account. That could be even, that's already, it's really so tied to what we believe we deserve, right? Or what we believe we can have.

Unknown:

Absolutely, I would totally agree. And there's also an interesting dynamic that happens that I've seen with many of our mentoring clients, and that is initially it feels a little bit like a burden, kind of unusual, can I really manage the remaining 90% and stuff. But what happens kind of almost in a transitory way, is that people now see this accumulation actually happening. And more and more people don't just have this one pay event or to pay events if they get paid every other week, but they have other things too, like maybe doing some side gig or some other side business or Amazon shop or whatever, maybe he Bay. And so there are multiple of these pay yourself, first events, and some of them may even be more than 10%. Right? Whether it's some unexpected money coming in, and you don't necessarily plan on it, and you can use 8090, maybe even 100% and put it in. And this transition that happens is that people start asking themselves, how many of the things that I thought I need on a monthly basis? Do I really need? And I think the pandemic if you know, we think about it, is it all bad or were there some positive things? I think one of the massive positive things out of the last two years is that a lot Have people started to reflect? Do I need, for example, at Starbucks run twice a day for 10 bucks. That's why I really need to go out with my colleagues for lunch. And if the if the company shut down and you were working at home, you suddenly realize that hundreds of dollars, sometimes even 1000, or $1,500, that kind of disappeared. Because you thought you needed to get the coffee, you thought you needed to go to lunch, you thought you needed to eat out for dinner and stuff like that. And guess what, when you didn't have the opportunity to do all of that, all your other life aspects kept going on without spending that money. So this transition that happens in the last few years, somewhat forced by the pandemic, but what I see in our clients is that they've started asking you, so how much of the other expenses that I have? Do I really need? And it's kind of funny that initially, because I'm this kind of cheerleader to do the pay yourself first thing, and then I have to be more like, somebody who's riding horses, which I'm not good at or know nothing about other than you have to pull the reins if you want to make this or slower, right, because some people they go on this complete frugality trip and say, Oh, I think I can save some here and I do I really need that and my closest, and suddenly it's not 10 gets like borderline. Okay, yeah, right. Now, frugality is a good thing. But you don't want to get to a point where you're denying yourself, just normal things of life and any joy in life, just because you want to reach a certain number goal that you gave yourself. And that's why I think 10% Or maybe 15, at the most is a realistic thing that doesn't necessarily deprive you of most of the other things in life that you would probably otherwise be enjoying, right? It's not the replacement therapies, so to speak, it's to say, I want to help you to reach a goal that gives you and that's why I call a time freedom point. I want you to have the freedom to say, Do I want to work for this employed full time, half time? Not at all? Do I have a passion? Like for example, you say I love painting, but my paintings probably never going to make any money. Well, if you have enough passive income, it doesn't matter. If you like to do photography of birds, or bird watching, or any, you name any things where you wouldn't expect to make money out of it. If that's your passion, it really satisfies you, it grounds you it gives you this, this kind of feeling that you have when you really enjoy being on a vacation or discovering a new place. Imagine that could be every day. And, and feeling safe and secure and satisfied and enjoy that feeling happens when you don't have to worry about money. And that's why developing this passive income to a point where you have the freedom to say what do I really want to do with this one resource that is not you can save time, you can replace time, it's just basically like water flows, and you're flowing with it. And then it becomes a matter of what do I do with this most precious commodity time. And I understand that myself included, we can do start immediately tomorrow if we haven't done this approach for a while. But I tell people, honestly, for your listeners, if they ask themselves, what how long is this thing going to take? depending a little bit on where you are in in your life in your career, I always say and it is proven eight to 10 years. And even though I know in our instant gratification society, that seems like an enormously long time. But just ask yourself, if you are 35 right now, and you would have that freedom at 42 Is it worth it, or if you're 40, and you can say at 48 or not 50 I'm done. I will never have to do active work to make money again, I have the freedom to do whatever I like, which can include keep doing what you're doing now. But it doesn't have to.

Sibylle Georgianna:

It doesn't have to and I think the minute we put in like an option that's always good for the brain that we don't feel locked in, you know, we we can execute that option or we can just keep keep it there beside you know, and that's so powerful. I love that about that time freedom point where it's like in your hands versus a lot of times we don't again, we don't think we own apple. So you know, how what's the point right. So that is so pretty as well as how you how you shared that about time as our as our commodity. So usually I have a question, you know, including for our time here about reduce afraid so that if we were to say if I hear you, right, the ability to create these beautiful, you know, capacities for just having options later on maybe in a couple of years, you know, maybe shorter sooner than me maybe thinking and I heard from more than one person in my neighborhood how, you know, the pandemic allowed their kids to get the downpayment ready, you know, and they weren't from this, you know, Starbucks and all that. But you described, you know, we may be having things at our fingertips here, that you inspire us to pursue, that we may not even be aware of. So that usually I ask people, if there's something you could redo for some, from some time of your life, would you redo it? But in here, it sounds like there is no need to have a redo. You know, it's just like you could create something different, instead of having to think about it we do. I don't know if that makes sense.

Unknown:

Yeah. Well, I saw that you you had planned for the question. And it's actually kind of funny, because one of the questions that I asked on my podcast is, if you had a time machine that can go forward or backward, where would you go and why? For me, if I had to redo, and the real important caveat, I want to always point out for people is a redo without losing the knowledge that I have, right? If I say, okay, I can go back in time, but I don't forget what I know. Now, then the thing that I would definitely redo is, as you mentioned, in the intro, I was in the military and before I came over to the United States, we had bought our first house, I was 28 years old. And then throughout that military career here in the US, we were moved around over and over and over. And if I look back at that time, from that very first house, knowing what I know, now, I should have never sold. Right? So the one mistake and that's why I actually do something like the idea about go website and the ideal investor shows because I want people to learn from the mistake if you really want to phrase it that way of ever selling real estate, if there's any possibility. And this is not just true for real estate, this is true for everything that falls under the category of value asset. Like value assets would be real estate, it would be gold, silver, jewelry, art, any of those kinds of things, something that other people would get and give a value to, and especially for those where you can see value increases over time. Right? So that would be my lesson that I try to learn from and help other people who are younger than me to not make the same mistake. Because it's two things. One is the first phase is how do I accumulate assets, value assets? Hopefully, such kind that is actually helping me to develop passive income, like we said, and then how do I actually live in an environment where I have passive income to live from. So I have like, in my case, the passion for me is to share what I learned without necessarily needing to be making tons of money with it, because the money that I need to sustain myself and my family comes from the passive income, right? But to get there sooner rather than later, you want to start as early as possible, right? I always give the joke. What is the best time to invest in value assets is 25 years ago, and the second best time is today. Right? And if you look at anything like that, if you look at what real estate anywhere in the world, in the developed world look cost 25 years ago, it's laughable. If you look at what Gold Cost 25 years ago, laughable. Crypto didn't even exist. But if you bought it on the first day, or in the first few years, it's just amazing. You would be multi multimillionaire if you had Bitcoin. And you bought a when it was $10 or $100 or even $1,000 Right? And at those prices, people sent $1,000 for a Bitcoin Are you nuts? And now it's $60,000. Right? So so those are and people debate if bitcoin or any cryptocurrency is a value asset, but I want people to think, what are things that in your experience or ask your parents ask your grandparents ask your editor, so to speak? What are things that retain or increase their value, and what's also becoming more important, we have not been civilian, I know that we both coming from Germany have always known about inflation. That's right, from a historic point that I Weimar Republic and stuff like that, but we personally probably didn't live through much of it. Because it's been almost extinct for a long time. Now it's come back. And this is for me a joy because I can now go back and say now we have living proof, the difference between anything consumable and a value asset, because as house prices increase, they will continue to increase at least at the level of inflation and when that level is five or 6%. Well, then all the stuff that you pay 30,020 $1,000 For is going to be in 20 years, they're gonna laugh about the prices we pay right now, even though they feel ridiculous right now. Right? And that's that whole dynamic to actually focus on how can I accumulate assets that pay me passive income, inflation protected, and basically protect my family in the sense of building a legacy. For me, when people say, you know, what is one of the biggest things that you want to do going forward is basically just keep going the portfolio, so I can turn it over to my daughter, when I'm going over the rainbow bridge, and then she can either decide to keep going it or just enjoying it and nurture it. And if she has kids, turn it over to them. That's the beauty of a value asset, right? Like, imagine you were the owner of the Egyptian pyramids. And that would be a high rise now, you know, like the one in Las Vegas. Right? Can you imagine the amount of passive income that would have made in the last 6000 years?

Sibylle Georgianna:

I heard somebody else recently say he's like, I'm going to be known, like, my grandkids will say, I had, I had, I had a grandfather, right? Who was rich, who turned me Rich, who made me rich, and that kind of the legacy piece, right? I'm really appealing to us to think about.

Unknown:

Yeah, absolutely. I mean, I don't know, Rich is always some weird word for me. But why is he I think is, you know, wealth is multifaceted. It's not just money. And I would wish I mean, my daughter is going to move in one of the houses that we originally bought, right? It's gonna be for her own career in investing, if there is one in a sense, or passive income generation, that's her starting point. But the thing is also to say, okay, these assets, we remain, we don't don't remain, we are basically here for blink in time continuum, but the assets remain. And if they're well made, and well built, as that's why I use the example of the Egyptian pyramids, they can remain for a very long time, and they can support generation after generation after generation. And, you know, to maybe go back to your initial question around mindset. I think it's worth asking ourselves every so often, when we have a calm moment, how would my life have been or could be, if I wouldn't be expected or us or fear compelled to exchange this valuable thing called time for money? Right, if there if you could give something to the next generation, and it would be they don't ever have to be forced to exchange time for money they can choose, or they don't have to. And that's, for me, that's a huge, huge motivation to say, you know, my parents and grandparents grew up like that after World War Two, and I'm probably the first generation that can allow my daughter and any generation after at least give them the opportunity to not have to make that choice.

Sibylle Georgianna:

Yeah, that's so meaningful. I grew up on a farm, and that farm has been in the family for 1000 years. So. So it's kind of like a, and it goes with a lot of work and labor. So you know, we don't necessarily look at that as such a starting point. But I think it's been so I don't want to use the word rich again. So Dave, what you shared, which is much more than what I can see, you know, with with wealth management, or even just thinking about our financial well being. Sometimes we don't even we don't even think about the legacy, right? We think how we can make it from paycheck to paycheck, or how we can have a little bit extra? Well, we could put aside in case of, as you say, you know, jobs shifting. But I think you've opened as much more than I as to what we can realistically with just having a little bit of all payment to ourselves. Create an a legacy today, where we may not even have thought about that before the beginning of this

Unknown:

episode. Absolutely. And that's actually why we have the term grow in our name, right? Like grow is a model that comes from coaching and mentoring, you're probably familiar with it. But it also is meant in a literal way. If you think about this continuum, little bit like a tree, right? And creating these value assets that we spoke about is basically like putting deeper and deeper roots into the ground. Right. And then I would surmise that when you say you come from a family that has a farm for 1000 years, that is a kind of deep, deep, big road, that if everything else fails, you can go back to and if I were to use the analogy further, I would say what Too many people, in my view experience as life is basically floating around unrooted. And a little wind, a little wave, a little bit of some kind of calamity can throw them off their path and give them there is nothing there, that brings them back to some kind of foundation to some kind of road. And that's part of like in a bigger picture thing, what I would like to do not just from a legacy perspective, but help more people to put these roots down, not in a literal sense for themselves being stationary. But put these roots down from a financial mindset point of view, not just for yourself as long as you're around. But for this tree of the family that you belong to, so that the Members Current and future can come back and say this is my 1000 year old farm that the villa inherited 1000 years ago already. And there were another 1000 years before that, or 500, or 100. And I think it's not a matter of the number if your farm or your roots in your tree start today. And they grow for the next 30 years, and then 40 or 50. And then you turn them over to the next person to keep nurturing it and make it a bigger tree and get more branches and bigger roots. That's fine. But we need to start at some point by that's why I also in the background, if you had if you had video, you would see there's a book that really inspired me it's called lazy gardener.

Sibylle Georgianna:

Oh, that's awesome. Yeah. Now we can put that in the show notes, too.

Unknown:

Yeah, it's just by John. So for Rick, he wrote that for his son. And it's basically a favor in a way of somebody who spent his life tending to a farm. And in the end, the farm turned into a winery in the winery had lots of old roots, and ultimately turned into a legacy. And that really, I thought was an inspiring thing. That's partially why we put the term or the word grow in our name. Because I really feel you know, we, when you go to the term purpose, mind, mindset is massively enriched when you can answer the question, what's your purpose?

Sibylle Georgianna:

Absolutely. I couldn't agree more. Yes, absolutely. That is so beautiful. That's really wonderful. I think there's so much to kind of develop from here. So I'd love to have you back at some point. I was like, I'm not done. But the episode maybe like to the point that the listener wants to put a bookmark, start mulling it over, start looking at, you know, choices and options, we wouldn't have enough envisioned like this. And, and then we can keep cultivating and keep coming back to the garden, right, so to speak. Because, as you say, the grounding, I believe is, especially in our day and age is, is everything and it's could be spiritual, it could be from the mindset of creating things could be from from the lens of legacy. And so we know how to track you down on your website. It's not the website is ideal wealth grower.com or by looking through full access podcast that the ideal investor show, so I can't thank you enough for that beautiful share. And then as we as we let this a little bit, you know, as we as we digest this, this I want to say rich again, this deep information. I look forward to learning more and maybe taking another dive into the financial wellness aspect with you. Thank you so much for you

Unknown:

absolutely Sibylle. It was a pleasure. And for anybody listening, don't forget to pay yourself first.

Sibylle Georgianna:

I should go home and do that first. Okay, thanks so much for your time. I'll talk to you soon. Thank you